Quick Facts

This page provides you with Quick Facts from the 2011 Census data releases on various topics. Information available includes facts from both the first and second data releases, including:

  • Population of Victoria (metropolitan Melbourne and regional Victoria) 
  • Population growth and distribution 
  • Growth in overseas born population 
  • Household types 
  • Employment
  • Labour force participation
  • and more

First Release Facts

1. What is the usual resident population of Australia?

The usual resident population of Australia at the 2011 Census was 21,507,717. This compares to the 2006 and 2001 Australian total population of 19,855,287 and 18,769,249 persons respectively.

2. Which State or Territory in Australia had the largest growth?

Of all the States and Territories in Australia, Queensland had the largest growth in usual resident population, growing by 428,207 between the 2006 and 2011 censuses.

3. Which capital city had the greatest amount of population growth and which had the fastest average annual growth rate?

Between 2006 and 2011, Melbourne capital city* grew by the greatest amount (368,372 persons). The average annual growth rate for that five year period was 1.9%.

Perth was the capital city with the fastest average annual growth with a rate of 2.9%.

4. What was the growth in the overseas born population of Australia?

Between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, the overseas born population of Australia grew by 878,110. This is much greater than the growth that occurred between 2001 and 2006, when the overseas born population increased by 310,593.

5. What is the usual resident population of Victoria?

The usual resident population of Victoria grew by 421,620 persons between the 2006 and 2011 censuses to reach 5,354,042 persons. This is considerably greater than the population growth for Victoria between 2001 and 2006, which was 271,431 persons.

6. How was Victoria’s growth split between metropolitan Melbourne, regional cities and the remainder of regional Victoria (the 38 rural and regional local government areas)?

Between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, 82.5 per cent of Victoria’s population growth was in metropolitan Melbourne (the 31 metropolitan local government areas), 10.0 per cent was in Victoria’s ten regional cities, and 7.6 per cent was in the remainder of regional Victoria (the 38 regional and rural local government areas).

Metropolitan Melbourne’s population increased by 347,632 between 2006 and 2011, compared with 225,422 between 2001 and 2006.

7. Which Local Government Area (LGA) in Victoria has the largest population?

In Victoria, the LGA with the largest population was the City of Casey. It grew from 213,561 in 2006, to 251,324 in 2011.

8. How have Melbourne’s Growth Area Councils grown between the 2006 and 2011 censuses?

Between the 2006 and 2011 censuses, Melbourne’s Growth Area councils (City of Casey, Cardinia Shire Council, Hume City Council, Shire of Melton, City of Whittlesea, and Wyndham City Council) grew by 183,726 people. This represented 50 per cent of metropolitan Melbourne’s total population growth.

The average annual population growth rate of the Growth Area councils was 4.6 per cent between 2006 and 2011, compared to Melbourne’s 1.9 per cent.

9. What share of metropolitan Melbourne’s total population do the growth areas hold?

In 2006, the Growth Area councils represented 20 per cent of metropolitan Melbourne’s total population. In 2011, they were home to 23 per cent.

10. What share of regional Victoria’s growth was in the ten regional cities?

Between 2006 and 2011 censuses, 56.8 per cent of regional Victoria’s population growth was in the ten regional cities, compared with 43.2 per cent in the remaining 38 rural and regional local government areas (LGAs) in regional Victoria.

11. What was the population and growth rates of the ten regional cities at the 2011 census?

Between 2006 and 2011, all regional cities experienced population growth. In relation to growth rates, with the exception of Ballarat (1.9 per cent), the regional cities had growth rates below the Victorian average of 1.7 per cent per annum between 2006 and 2011. The large regional cities of Greater Geelong (1.3 per cent) and Greater Bendigo (1.5 per cent), along with Wodonga (1.5 per cent) and Greater Shepparton (1.2 per cent), had higher growth rates than the average for regional Victoria generally (1.1 per cent).

12. What is the median age and household income in the regional cities?

Compared with the 38 rural and regional LGAs of regional Victoria, regional cities’ populations are generally younger and have higher incomes.

The median age in regional cities was generally higher than metropolitan Melbourne (36 years) but generally lower than most of the 38 rural and regional LGAs of regional Victoria.

Median weekly household incomes in regional cities ranged from a high of $1,075 (Wodonga) to $878 in Mildura. This compares with a median of $945 for regional Victoria and $1,333 for metropolitan Melbourne.

13. What was the growth in Victoria’s overseas born population?

Between 2006 and 2011, Victoria’s overseas born population increased by 232,125 or 19.8 per cent to reach 1,405,334. Most of this growth (88.0 per cent) was in metropolitan Melbourne where the overseas born population increased by 204,191.

At the 2011 Census, 196,857 people born overseas stated that they had arrived in Victoria since the start of 2006.

14. What proportion of Victoria’s population were born overseas?

In 2011, 26.2 per cent of Victorians and 24.6 per cent of Australians were born overseas. These compare to 2010 UN figures for New Zealand (22.4 per cent), Canada (21.3 per cent), United States (13.5 per cent), United Kingdom (10.4 per cent) and Japan (1.7 per cent).

15. Which are the main countries of origin for overseas born populations?

At the 2011 census, the main overseas born populations in Victoria were: UK (213,375), India (111,787), China (93,897), New Zealand (80,236), Italy (76,906) and Vietnam (68,297).

16. What is the proportion of children aged 17 or under in Growth Areas?

Children aged 17 or under represented 27 per cent of Growth Area population, compared to 22 per cent for metropolitan Melbourne’s, and 11 per cent for inner Melbourne.

17. What is the usual resident population of inner Melbourne (Melbourne, Port Phillip and Yarra LGA’s, and the Prahran part of the City of Stonnington)?

The usual resident population of inner Melbourne increased by 35,251 persons (or 2.5 per cent per annum) between the 2006 and 2011 censuses. This compares with an average growth rate of 1.9 per cent per annum for metropolitan Melbourne (the 31 LGAs) and 1.7 per cent per annum for Victoria as a whole.

18. What is inner Melbourne’s share of metropolitan Melbourne’s population?

In 2006, inner Melbourne had 7.5% of metropolitan Melbourne’s population. In 2011, this increased slightly to 7.8%.

19. In inner Melbourne, which age groups have the highest proportion?

Inner Melbourne had a very high proportion of people aged between 18 and 34 years (43.8 per cent). The comparable figure for metropolitan Melbourne was 25.7 per cent, and for Victoria 23.8 per cent.

Inner Melbourne had a low proportion of both people aged under 18 (11.4 per cent) and those over 65 (9.7 per cent). The comparable figures for metropolitan Melbourne were 22.1 and 13.1 per cent, and for Victoria 22.5 and 14.2 per cent.

20. What proportion of people who live in inner Melbourne are students?

Large numbers of students live in inner Melbourne: 14.2 per cent of the inner Melbourne population were enrolled at a tertiary education institution compared with 9.3 per cent for Victoria.

21. How many people living in inner Melbourne were born overseas?

A large number of people living in inner Melbourne stated that they were born overseas (35.7 per cent). This compares to metropolitan Melbourne at 31.5 per cent.

22. How have household types changed in metropolitan Melbourne?

In 2011, 23.4 per cent of Melbourne’s households consisted of one person, 32.0 per cent of two people and 44.7 per cent of three or more. There was relatively little change over the 5-year period since 2006.

There has been growth in the numbers of all household types. Couple only households are increasing at a faster rate (2.3 per cent per annum) than family households with children (1.8 per cent per annum) and lone-person households (1.6 per cent per annum).

23. What was Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population at the 2011 Census?

At the 2011 census, Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 37,988 persons, an increase of 7,848 from that at the 2006 census (30,140 persons). This represents a growth rate of 4.7% per annum.

At the 2011 census, Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 0.7% of Victoria’s total population, compared with 0.6% at the 2006 census.

The 2006-2011 growth rate of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population (4.7% per annum) compares with a growth for Victoria’s population as a whole of 1.7% per annum.

Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population was 6.9% of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. This compares with 6.6% in 2006.

24. How many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders were under 15 years of age?

More than one in three (35.2%) Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in Victoria was under 15 years of age. Just 4.3% of this population was aged 65 and over.

25. Where do Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population live?

At the 2011 census, 46.3% of Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived in metropolitan Melbourne (17,573 persons) compared with 53.7% in regional Victoria (20,415 persons).  In 2006, 46.9% of Victoria’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population lived in metropolitan Melbourne (14,122 persons) compared with 53.1% in regional Victoria (16,018 persons).

This compares with the total Victorian population of which 73.6% lived in metropolitan Melbourne and 26.2% in regional Victoria. In 2006, 72.8% of the total Victorian population lived in metropolitan Melbourne, and 27.1% in regional Victoria.

Between 2006 and 2011, metropolitan Melbourne’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population grew by 3,451 (or 24.4%) compared with regional Victoria’s which grew by 4,397 (or 27.5%).

Second Release Facts

1. What was the growth of employed persons in Australia between 2006 and 2011?

The number of employed persons in Australia grew by 1.0 million between 2006 and 2011.

2. What was the growth of employed persons in Victoria between 2006 and 2011?

The number of employed persons in Victoria grew by 292,000 between 2006 and 2011. Victoria had the largest single increase in the number of employed persons during this period, followed by New South Wales (285,000) and Queensland (254,000). Victoria has the second largest labour market, following New South Wales.

3. Which states had the highest rates of growth?

In terms of rate of growth, the resource rich states of Western Australia (4.0%) and Queensland (2.8%) had the highest annual rates of growth, followed by Victoria (2.6%).

4. Where did the bulk of the growth for Victoria occur?

The bulk of this growth occurred in Metropolitan Melbourne while a small proportion occurred in regional Victoria. According to the 2011 Census, there are 1.7 million jobs in Metropolitan Melbourne and 500,000 in regional Victoria.

5. What were the main industries for this growth?

Much of Victoria’s growth during this period occurred in the following industry sectors: Population Services, Business Services, and Property, Construction and Utilities. There were declines in employment in the Manufacturing and Primary Industries sectors.

6. What was the change in Victoria’s labour force between 2001 and 2011?

Victoria’s labour force grew by 430,000 (19.3%) between 2001 and 2011.

7. How has labour force participation rates changed?

Labour force participation rates in Victoria have been increasing for people aged over 50 years. For instance, the labour force participation rate of 50-54 year olds has increased from 77% to 82%, and for 60-64 year olds from 38% to 53%, between 2001 and 2011.

Part time work accounts for 40% of the increased employment of people aged 50 years and over.

There has been a slight decrease in the labour force participation rates of young adults (aged under 25 years). This is probably due to greater attendance in further education which delays entry into the workforce.

8. Which metropolitan Local Government Areas in Victoria (LGAs) had the largest increase in jobs between 2006 and 2011?

The five metropolitan LGAs with the largest increase in jobs were:

Local Government Area - (Increase in jobs 2006 to 2011)
Melbourne (C) - (62,820)
Yarra (C) - (9,850)
Hume (C) - (7,250)
Whittlesea (C) - (7,120)
Wyndham (C) - (6,650)

9. Which regional Local Government Areas in Victoria (LGAs) had the largest increase in jobs between 2006 and 2011?

The five regional LGAs with the largest increase in jobs were:

Local Government Area - (Increase in jobs 2006 to 2011)
Geelong (C) - (4,510)
Bass Coast (S) - (3,460)
Baw Baw (S) - (1,510)
Greater Bendigo (C) - (1,240)
Surf Coast (S) - (1,160)

10. What was the growth of employment in Melbourne’s Growth Area LGAs?

Employment in Melbourne’s Growth Area LGAs grew by 34,000 jobs between 2006 and 2011. In 2011, the Growth Area LGAs contained 13.5% of metropolitan Melbourne’s employment. Overall, the Growth Area LGAs contained 9.6% of Victoria’s employment.

Hume had the greatest amount of employment growth for the Growth Area LGAs with 7,252 jobs. Melton had the highest annual average growth rate of 7.2% per annum.

11. How many people are employed in Inner Melbourne?

In 2011, 491,600 persons worked in Inner Melbourne. Around 41% of Inner Melbourne employment was in Business Services.

12. What was the growth in employment for Inner Melbourne between 2006 and 2011?

Between 2006 and 2011, employment in Inner Melbourne grew by 69,800 jobs.
The City of Melbourne had the single largest increase of all LGAs in Victoria during this period growing by 62,800 jobs.

If you have any queries about the above information, please contact us or visit the ABS website.

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